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An Arrhythmia is one of the common heart ailments and is characterized by your heart beating faster or slower compared to the norm. There are several different types of arrhythmias, including atrial fibrillation, supraventricular tachycardia, and ventricular tachycardia. Some people with arrhythmias may not experience any symptoms, while others may experience symptoms such as heart palpitations, dizziness, chest pain, and fainting. There are several factors that can increase the risk of developing arrhythmias, including high blood pressure, heart disease, and the use of certain medication.

Can Meditation Help With Arrhythmia? 

Mediation is relaxing- it not only calms your mind but also benefits your heart. While there’s no sure-shot guarantee that meditating will treat Arrhythmia, it can certainly help you deal with it. Meditation reduces stress, improves your concentration, and connects you with your body. Simple breathing techniques can regularize your heartbeat and help you reduce tachycardia. Try relaxation and heart breathing, and most importantly listen to your body while meditating. Meditation, in general, has a lot of benefits, so guided meditation after consulting your doctor will help you deal with heart ailments.

Does mindfulness meditation help deal with Arrhythmia?

It’s important to remember that meditation is a personal practice, and everyone’s experience will be different. It may take some time to find a meditation technique that works best for you, so be patient and don’t get discouraged if you have difficulty getting started. It may be helpful to try different techniques and find a guided meditation or a class to help you get started. Several studies have shown that mindfulness meditation, in particular, may be effective in reducing the frequency and severity of arrhythmia episodes. Mindfulness meditation involves focusing on the present moment and being aware of one’s thoughts and feelings without judgment.

How to meditate for a healthy heart?

There are several ways to incorporate meditation into your daily routine to potentially benefit your heart health, here are a few tips to help you meditate for a healthy heart.

  1. Find a quiet, comfortable place where you can sit or lie down without being disturbed.
  2. Close your eyes and take a few deep breaths, focusing on the sensation of the air entering and leaving your body.
  3. Bring your attention to your breathing and try to let go of any distracting thoughts. If your mind wanders, gently redirect your attention back to your breathing.
  4. You can also try focusing on a mantra (a word or phrase) that you repeat to yourself, to help keep your mind focused.
  5. Continue this practice for 5-10 minutes, gradually increasing the length of your meditation sessions as you become more comfortable.

Are Arrhythmias Always Harmful?

Not all arrhythmias are harmful. In some cases, an arrhythmia may be benign and therefore not require treatment. However, some arrhythmias can be serious and potentially life-threatening, especially if they cause the heart to beat too fast or too slow, or if they interfere with the heart’s ability to pump blood effectively. In some cases, arrhythmia may require urgent medical attention, so it’s important to seek medical care as soon as possible if you are experiencing symptoms such as chest pain, shortness of breath, or fainting.

How Is Arrhythmia Diagnosed?

Arrhythmia is usually diagnosed through a combination of medical history, physical examination, and tests. Some common tests used to diagnose arrhythmia include:

  1. Electrocardiography (ECG): An ECG is a test that records the electrical activity of the heart using electrodes placed on the chest, arms, and legs. An ECG can show abnormal heart rhythms and help to determine the type of arrhythmia. For added protection you can purchase a heart rate monitor with an ECG feature – the Frontier X2 is a great choice. 
  2. Holter monitoring: This is a continuous ECG monitoring test that records the heart’s activity over a period of 24 hours or longer. The patient wears a small portable device that records the heart’s activity during daily activities.
  3. Stress testing: A stress test involves exercising on a treadmill or stationary bike while your heart’s activity is monitored. The test is used to see how the heart responds to physical activity and can help to identify arrhythmias that occur during exercise.
  4. Echocardiography: This is a test that uses ultrasound to produce images of the heart. It can help to determine the cause of arrhythmia and assess the overall function of the heart.
  5. Electrophysiology study (EPS): An EPS is a specialized test that is used to diagnose arrhythmia. It involves inserting thin, flexible wires through a vein to the heart to record the heart’s electrical activity and thereby locate the source of the arrhythmia.

How Is Arrhythmia Treated? 

Treatment for arrhythmia may vary depending on the type and severity of the arrhythmia, as well as the presence of any underlying health conditions. Some common treatments for arrhythmia include:

  1. Medication: Various medications can be used to treat arrhythmia, including beta blockers, calcium channel blockers, and anti-arrhythmic drugs. This medication can help to slow or regulate the heart rate, helping prevent an arrhythmia from occurring.
  2. Lifestyle changes: Making healthy lifestyle changes, such as quitting smoking, eating a healthy diet, and getting regular exercise, may help to manage arrhythmia and reduce the risk of arrhythmia episodes.
  3. Medical Procedures: In some cases, procedures such as catheter ablation or implantation of a pacemaker may be necessary to treat arrhythmia. Catheter ablation involves using a catheter to locate and destroy abnormal heart tissue that is causing the arrhythmia. A pacemaker is a small device that is implanted under the skin and helps to regulate the heart rate by delivering electrical impulses to the heart.
  4. Alternative therapies: Some people with arrhythmia may find relief with alternative therapies such as acupuncture or herbal remedies. However, it’s important to consult with a healthcare provider before starting any alternative therapy to ensure that it is safe and appropriate for you.

Finally, pair your knowledge of meditation with the use of a heart monitoring device to best respond to your heart condition. Purchase the revolutionary Frontier X2 and be on your way to a healthier tomorrow.

Frequently asked Questions :


What Is Arrhythmia? 

Arrhythmia is one of the common heart ailments where your heart may beat faster or slower compared to others. An irregular heartbeat is known as Arrhythmia. 

Can Meditation Help With Arrhythmia?

It cannot fully cure it, but adding guided meditation to your daily routine can help you reduce Arrhythmia. 

Is Arrhythmia Serious? 

Arrhythmias are mostly and harmless; however, in some cases, they can create severe complications by interfering with blood flow to your body.

Can You Live A Healthy Life With Arrhythmia?

If managed correctly with all the precautions in place, you can lead a healthy and active life with Arrhythmia. 

Do You Need To Visit Your Doctor For Arrhythmia? 

If you feel any symptoms, it’s always advisable to seek medical help. 

Other Heart Health Topics To Explore:

Yoga for a Healthy Heart | Stretching Exercise for Heart Health | Persistent AFib | Atrial Fibrillation Episode | Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation | Types of Atrial Fibrillation | Heart Skips a Beat | Hypothyroidism Cause Heart Arrhythmias | Benefits for Aquatic Exercise for Heart | Smart Heart Rate Monitor

Frontier X2:

Smart Heart ECG Monitor in USA | ECG Machine Price in India | Best Heart Rate Monitor UK

Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the leading cause of stroke and can increase the risk of heart failure, cardiac arrest, and other cardiovascular complications. It is also associated with an increased risk of mortality. As per estimates made by the CDC (Ref. Link) 12.1 million people in the United States will have AFib in 2030.

How to live with Persistent AFib?

Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is a type of abnormal heart rhythm that can be managed with the help of healthcare and lifestyle changes. If you have long-standing persistent AFib, which has lasted for more than a year, it is important to work with your healthcare provider to develop a plan to manage your condition and reduce the risk of complications. Here are some strategies that may be helpful for living with long-standing persistent AFib:

  1. Take medication as prescribed: Your healthcare provider may prescribe medication to help control your heart rhythm and prevent complications such as a stroke. It is important to take this medications as prescribed and report any adverse effects or concerns to your healthcare provider.
  2. Follow a healthy lifestyle: Eating a healthy diet, exercising regularly, and avoiding tobacco and alcohol consumption can help to improve heart health and manage persistent AFib.
  3. Manage stress: Stress can trigger AFib episodes or make them more frequent. Strategies such as deep breathing, meditation, and exercise can help to manage stress and reduce the risk of AFib.
  4. Get regular medical checkups: It is important to see your healthcare provider regularly to monitor your heart health and AFib. Your healthcare provider may recommend tests such as an electrocardiogram (ECG) to check your heart rhythm and determine the need for any changes to your treatment plan.
  5. Find support: Living with a chronic condition can be challenging. Seeking support from friends, family, or a support group can be helpful in managing the emotional and practical aspects of living with long-standing persistent AFib.

What is the difference between Paroxysmal, Persistent, and Chronic AFib?

Paroxysmal AFib is characterised by episodes of AFib that come and go. These episodes can last from a few minutes to a few days, and can be triggered by factors such as stress, caffeine, alcohol, or exercise. Paroxysmal AFib is often self-terminating, meaning that it can stop on its own without treatment.

Persistent AFib is a continuous or sustained episode of AFib that lasts for more than seven days. Medical intervention may be required to return the heart to a normal rhythm. Persistent AFib is more serious than paroxysmal AF because it increases the risk of stroke and other complications.

Chronic AFib is a term that is sometimes used to describe AFib that has been present for a long time, typically more than a year. 

It is important to note that the terms “chronic” and “persistent” are not interchangeable. Persistent AFib refers to a specific type of AFib that is continuous or sustained for more than seven days, while chronic AFib refers to AFib that has simply been present for a long time. 

How do doctors determine when a patient has long standing Atrial Fibrillation?

A doctor will do a physical examination and ask questions about your symptoms to diagnose Persistent Atrial Fibrillation. Since paroxysmal Afib frequently progresses to Persistent Afib, your doctor may already be checking you for it regularly.

Even if your heart rhythm is normal during your appointment, your doctor may recommend a Holter or mobile heart monitor. These monitors can keep tabs on your heart rate for a full day. Arrhythmias can also be detected with the use of fitness tracker data. You can use a chest strap ECG machine or heart rate monitor to record your heart’s electrical activity easily. 

Who is susceptible to long-standing persistent AFib?

AFib can appear in anyone at any age. Having AFib is possible if you:

  1. Have high blood pressure and are over 60
  2. Have a cardiac condition or heart-related structural issue
  3. Suffer from heart disease, having had sinus problems operation
  4. Have a history of AFib in your family, and are a binge drinker
  5. Develop sleep apnea
  6. Have long-term illnesses, including asthma, diabetes, or hyperthyroidism

What are the risk factors for long-standing persistent AFib?

1. Medication

A higher risk of developing AFib has been linked to high doses of steroids for asthma or another illness. This type of treatment for other conditions could bring on an episode if your risk is already elevated. Over-the-counter cold remedies containing caffeine or other chemicals that increase heart rate can have the same effect.

2. Obesity, Diabetes, And Metabolic Syndrome

These disorders are associated with an increased risk of hypertension and may hinder the heart’s ability to pump blood. They increase the likelihood of Atrial Fibrillation and also cause other bodily abnormalities.

3. Atrial Tissue Injuries

Injuries to the atrial tissue that result from a blocked artery are the leading cause of Atrial Fibrillation. However, AFib does not typically cause heart attacks unless the pulse rate is extremely rapid.

4. Genes

Atrial Fibrillation runs in families. The genes you take from your parents may have contributed to your predisposition; if a member of your immediate family has it or has had it in the past, your risk increases.

It can be more challenging to treat Persistent AFib if it goes undetected for a lengthy period. Persistent AFib, if left untreated, might become permanent AFib. Stroke, heart attack, and death are all more likely when you have AFib, regardless of its severity or duration.

Complications from AFib can be avoided with proper management and treatment. It’s important to discuss treatment options with your doctor if you’ve been diagnosed with persistent AFib. The primary goal at this stage is to prevent the situation from worsening to a more permanent one.

 Finally, as mentioned earlier, using a smart heart monitor allows you to constantly keep tabs on the functioning of your heart. Purchase the revolutionary Frontier X2 heart monitoring device, and stay on top of your heart health at all times!

Frequently Asked Questions :

 

Which type of fibrillation is the most serious?

Although ventricular fibrillation is not as prevalent as AFib, it is much more dangerous. In the United States, it is the primary cause of death due to cardiac arrest.

What is the best exercise to engage in if I have Atrial Fibrillation?

After you’ve warmed up, you may get a solid workout without overtaxing your heart by doing power walking, jogging, or trekking. Workouts, including cardio equipment such as a stationary bike, elliptical trainer, or treadmill, are also acceptable for those with AFib.

What is considered a long episode of AFib?

To be classified as persistent AFib, an episode must last longer than seven days. Without medical intervention, it will continue. Drugs or electric shock therapy may be used to restore normal rhythm. AFib may be chronic or permanent and last for a very long time.

Other Heart Health Topics To Explore:

AFib Risk Factors | | Heart Palpitations After Eating | Best Heart Rate Monitor | Running Heart Rate | Arrhythmia Causes | Aquatic Exercise for Heart Health | Yoga for Heart Health | Silent heart attack | Stress Test for Heart | Wearable Heart Monitor

Frontier X2:

Smart Heart ECG Monitor in USA | ECG Machine Price in India | Best Heart Rate Monitor UK

Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is a type of irregular heartbeat that can cause symptoms such as heart palpitations, shortness of breath, and fatigue. AFib can sometimes be resolved naturally, but Persistent AFib is a type of AFib that does not go away on its own, requiring treatment to restore a normal heart rhythm. Persistent AFib can be managed with medication, medical procedures, or surgery, depending on both the severity and the underlying causes of the condition.

It is important for individuals with persistent AFib to work with their healthcare provider to develop a treatment plan and manage their condition. This may include lifestyle changes such as having a healthy diet, exercising regularly, and avoiding triggers such as alcohol and caffeine.

What is the difference between Paroxysmal and Persistent atrial fibrillation?

Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is a type of abnormal heart rhythm in which the atria (the upper chambers of the heart) beat irregularly and rapidly.

It can occur in two forms: paroxysmal and persistent.

Paroxysmal AFib is characterized by episodes of AFib that come and go. These episodes can last from a few minutes to a few days, and can be triggered by factors such as stress, caffeine, alcohol, or exercise. Paroxysmal AFib is often self-terminating, meaning that it can stop on its own without treatment.

Persistent AFib, on the other hand, is a continuous or sustained episode of AFib that lasts for more than seven days. It may require medical intervention to return the heart to a normal rhythm. Persistent AFib is more serious than paroxysmal AFib because it increases the risk of stroke and other complications.

In general, the treatment and management of paroxysmal and persistent AFib can be similar, but persistent AFib may require more aggressive treatment and a longer-term management plan.

What are the causes of Persistent Atrial Fibrillation?

There are several potential causes of persistent AFib, including:

  1. Coronary artery disease: This is a condition in which the arteries that supply blood to the heart become narrowed or blocked due to the accumulation of plaque. Coronary artery disease can lead to persistent AFib.
  2. High blood pressure: High blood pressure (hypertension) can damage the heart and increase the risk of AFib.
  3. Heart problems: Certain heart conditions, such as valvular heart disease (problems with the heart valves) or cardiomyopathy (disease of the heart muscle), can lead to persistent AFib.
  4. Thyroid disease: Abnormalities in the thyroid gland (a gland in the neck that produces hormones) can cause persistent AFib.
  5. Pulmonary embolism: This is a serious condition in which a blood clot travels to the lungs and blocks blood flow. A Pulmonary embolism can cause persistent AFib.
  6. Alcohol consumption: Heavy alcohol consumption can increase the risk of persistent AFib.
  7. Other risk factors: Other risk factors for persistent AFib include advancing age, family history of AFib, and certain medication.

How is Persistent AFib diagnosed?

Many people with AFib show no symptoms at all, making diagnosis challenging. As a result, most people with AFib don’t learn they have it until they go in for a checkup for something else.

However, those exhibiting any concerning symptoms should consult a medical professional for an official diagnosis. Either way, a doctor will inquire about the patient’s health background and prescribe various diagnostic procedures to this end.

Doctors can evaluate the progression of paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation if you’ve previously been diagnosed with it. Early stages of AFib can be diagnosed with an ECG, but more advanced or persistent AFib requires additional testing.

The following are some suggestions your physician may make:

  1. Checking blood levels for underlying conditions that may be contributing to the development of AFib, such as thyroid problems
  2. The use of chest X-rays to examine your heart’s chambers and valves, and to keep tabs on your heart’s health in general
  3. Using sound waves – an echocardiogram can detect any damage the heart has sustained.
  4. Reading your heart rate and rhythm following exercise is known as a “stress test.”

Persistent AFib treatment

When you have persistent AFib, your heart rhythm is so severely abnormal that it cannot be restored without medical intervention. In addition, blood clots, which can cause cardiac arrest or a stroke, become more likely. The goal of treating persistent AFib is to reduce the likelihood of life-threatening blood clots and restore a regular heartbeat. Treatment for persistent AFib may include medication to control your heart rate, and blood thinners to prevent blood clots. In some cases, a procedure called cardioversion may be used to shock the heart and restore a normal rhythm. In more severe cases, surgery such as a maze procedure or ablation may be necessary to correct the underlying cause of the AFib.

Medication

Medication that may be used to treat persistent AF:

  1. Antiarrhythmic drugs: This medication helps restore a normal heart rhythm and prevent AF episodes. Examples include beta blockers, calcium channel blockers, and flecainide.
  2. Blood thinners: This medication, such as warfarin or dabigatran, helps prevent blood clots that can lead to stroke in people with AF.
  3. Rate control medications: This medication (beta blockers or calcium channel blockers) helps slow down the heart rate and control symptoms during AF episodes.
  4. Cardioversion: This procedure involves the use of electrical shocks or medication to restore a normal heart rhythm. It is usually performed in cases of persistent AF that do not respond to other treatments.

Other Methods

Catheter ablation is a surgical treatment that has shown promise in stabilising the heart rhythm in patients with chronic AFib. These procedures necessitate opening the chest to reach the hyperactive cardiac tissue. In addition to medicine or surgery, your doctor may suggest a change in your way of life to help with your condition.

 These changes include:

  1. Diet changes
  2. Stress management
  3. The management of chronic illnesses
  4. Exercise

It can be more challenging to treat persistent AFib if it is not detected for an extended period of time. Permanent AFib might develop if persistent AFib is not treated.

 Accurate management and treatment of AFib is the best defence against its potential side effects. Talk to your doctor about your treatment choices if you have been diagnosed with persistent AFib.

 Finally, using a smart heart monitor allows you to constantly keep tabs on the functioning of your heart. Purchase the revolutionary Frontier X2 heart monitoring device, and stay on top of your heart health at all times!

Frequently Asked Questions on Persistent AFib :

How can I lower my chances of developing chronic Atrial Fibrillation?

Persistent Atrial Fibrillation can be managed with therapy, but lifestyle adjustments are often helpful. You may be recommended to avoid or modify certain activities if they cause your heart rate to become abnormally fast or irregular.

What should I do if I have persistent Atrial Fibrillation?

People with persistent Atrial Fibrillation can lead normal, active lives with proper treatment and regular management. However, the longer persistent Afib goes untreated, the more difficult it becomes to manage.

When should I seek medical attention for persistent Afib?

If you experience persistent Atrial Fibrillation symptoms, you must see your doctor right away. Heart palpitations and difficulty breathing are examples of these symptoms.

Is it necessary for me to restrict or limit my travel?

The heart may be affected by high altitudes and extreme temperatures. You should also be worried about your ability to drive safely or compete in sports.

How do I look after myself if I have Persistent AFib?

Follow your healthcare provider’s instructions to manage problems and treat symptoms of persistent Afib. Your provider can collaborate with you to create a personalised care plan to improve your health.

 

Other Heart Health Topics To Explore:

AFib Episodes | Hypothyroidism and Heart Arrhythmias | Arrhythmia Causes | Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation | Aquatic Exercise for Heart Health | Atrial Fibrillation and Exercise | Types of Atrial Fibrillation | Best Devices To Monitor Heart Health | Low Carb Diet | Heart Rate Monitor

Frontier X2:

Smart Heart ECG Monitor in USA | ECG Machine Price in India | Best Heart Rate Monitor UK

Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is a type of irregular heartbeat that can cause a wide range of symptoms. Some people with AFib may not experience any symptoms at all, while others may have symptoms that come and go. Some common symptoms of AFib include:

  • Heart palpitations: This is when you feel like your heart is racing, pounding, or fluttering.
  • Chest discomfort: This can include chest pain, pressure, or tightness.
  • Shortness of breath: This may be accompanied by feelings of fatigue or tiredness.
  • Lightheadedness or dizziness: These symptoms may be caused by the heart’s inability to pump enough blood to the body.

In severe cases, AFib can lead to more serious complications such as stroke or heart failure. If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, or are concerned about your heart health, it is important to speak with a healthcare provider for proper diagnosis and treatment.

What Happens During An Episode of Atrial Fibrillation?

Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is a type of irregular heartbeat that occurs when the atria, the upper chambers of the heart, beat in a disorganized and rapid way. This can cause the heart to pump less efficiently and can lead to a range of symptoms. During an episode of AFib, the atria beat very rapidly, often at rates of over 100 beats per minute. This rapid and irregular contraction can cause the atria to quiver or “fibrillate,” which is where the term “atrial fibrillation” comes from.

Can AFib Impact People At Any Age?

AFib can occur at any age and is more common in people who possess certain risk factors such as high blood pressure, diabetes, and heart disease. It can also be triggered by certain medication, alcohol, caffeine, or other factors such as stress or extreme physical activity. If you have AFib, it is important to speak with a healthcare provider about the best treatment options for your specific situation. Treatment may include medication to regulate the heartbeat, lifestyle changes to reduce triggers, or procedures such as ablation to correct the underlying cause of AFib.

What Are the Other Factors That Impact AFib Episodes?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Ref. Link) AFib affects between 2.7 and 6.1 million Americans. The research also suggests that these numbers are likely to go up significantly in the coming years. According to studies, paroxysmal AFib affects about 40% of patients who have AFib (Ref. Link). However, because it can be challenging to diagnose and categorize different kinds of AFib, estimates vary greatly. A significant risk factor for AFib is age. Older persons are more likely to get AFib. Paroxysmal AFib, however, is the most prevalent type of AFib found in younger patients.

What To Do During An Active AFib Episode?

If you are experiencing an active episode of atrial fibrillation (AFib), it is important to take the following steps:

  1. Stay calm: It can be easy to get anxious or panicked during an AFib episode, but try to stay as calm as possible.
  2. Check your pulse: If you are able to, try to check your pulse to see if it is irregular or rapid. If you are unable to check your pulse, or if you are unsure if your pulse is irregular, call for emergency medical assistance.
  3. Take any prescribed medications: If you have been prescribed medications to manage your AFib, take them as directed.
  4. Seek medical attention: If you are experiencing severe symptoms such as chest pain, difficulty breathing, or dizziness, or if this is your first AFib episode, it is important to seek medical attention as soon as possible.

Keep these symptoms in mind and be prepared to articulate them: 

What signs did you experience? 

Before the symptoms started, were there any “warning signs”?

Did the number of symptoms felt increase with time, or did they start all at once? 

Did the symptoms come and go, or were they constant? 

The medical staff will be able to diagnose the issue and choose the best course of treatment with whatever information you can provide them.

Disclose everything honestly; some patients are reluctant to disclose to their medical staff if they experience symptoms while working out, using alcohol or drugs, or engaging in sexual activity. You must describe the circumstances surrounding the onset of your AFib symptoms and AFib episode. Being open with your doctor is one of your most powerful weapons for managing atrial fibrillation.

Finally, using a smart heart monitor allows you to constantly keep tabs on the functioning of your heart. Purchase the revolutionary Frontier X2 heart monitoring device, and stay on top of your heart health at all times!

Frequently Asked Questions :


Why is atrial fibrillation an issue and what is it?

AFib, also known as atrial fibrillation, is an irregular heartbeat in which the atria don’t contract forcefully or rhythmically. The heart may not pump enough oxygen-rich blood to the body while it is in AFib. 

What are the biggest dangers associated with AFib? 

Stroke is the main cause of AFib risk. If you have atrial fibrillation, your chance of having a stroke is up to five times higher than it is for someone without it. Due to the eventual weakening of the heart muscle, you also run the danger of developing heart failure. 

Is AFib treatable or a lifelong condition? 

Although we don’t frequently claim that AFib is curable, certain factors, such sleep apnea, can be addressed to minimize the severity of your AFib. Stroke risk can also be decreased with the use of drugs and treatments that regulate heart rate and rhythm. No matter how long it lasts, AFib needs to be monitored by a physician. 

Can an AFib episode cause my death? 

Typically, no. AFib often doesn’t cause death on its own, although an AFib-related stroke can. AFib patients are more likely to get a stroke and other heart-related problems including heart failure. Working with your doctor or other medical experts to ensure you’re doing everything possible to avoid issues that might arise as a consequence of AFib is the most crucial thing you can do. 

Can someone with AFib have a long life? 

Even those with AFib can lead full, busy lifestyles. Your ability to control your AFib for the long term will be improved by reducing your risk factors for heart disease and stroke and being aware of potential triggers. Your physician can offer lifelong management advice.

Other Heart Health Topics To Explore:

Heart Rate Zones | Low Resting Heart Rate | Signs of Heart Attack | Atrial Fibrillation Treatment | Cardiovascular Disease | Heart Rate During Exercise | Best ECG Monitor.| Healthy Heart Exercise | Arrhythmia Symptoms

Frontier X2:

Smart Heart ECG Monitor in USA | ECG Machine Price in India | Best Heart Rate Monitor UK

What is Hypothyroidism? It is a condition defined by the thyroid gland’s inability to produce enough thyroid hormone. This deficiency of hormones can disrupt your heart rate, body temperature, and metabolism. Hypothyroidism can also cause heart arrhythmias. The thyroid gland plays a role in regulating the body’s metabolism, and when the thyroid gland is not producing enough hormones, the body’s metabolism may slow down, leading to a slower heart rate. This can result in arrhythmias, which are abnormal rhythms of the heart.

Symptoms of hypothyroidism can include fatigue, weight gain, dry skin, and cold intolerance. If you have these symptoms and are concerned about the possibility of hypothyroidism, it is important to see a healthcare provider for proper diagnosis and treatment. Treatment for hypothyroidism typically involves taking thyroid hormone replacement medication, which can help to restore normal thyroid function and regulate the heart rate.

Heart Arrhythmias and Hypothyroidism: What Does the Research Say?

In a study published by the American College of Cardiology, researchers found that people with hypothyroidism had a higher risk of developing atrial fibrillation, even after adjusting for other risk factors such as age and blood pressure. Atrial Fibrillation is a type of arrhythmia that involves irregular and rapid contractions of the heart’s upper chambers (the atria). The study included data from over 100,000 people and found that those with hypothyroidism had a 38% increased risk of atrial fibrillation compared to those without the condition.

Other research has also suggested that hypothyroidism may be associated with a higher risk of other types of arrhythmias, such as bradycardia (a slow heart rate) and tachycardia (a fast heart rate). It is important to note that more research is needed to fully understand the relationship between hypothyroidism and arrhythmias, and that the risk of arrhythmias may vary depending on the severity of the hypothyroidism and other factors.

What Is The Impact of Hypothyroidism On Your Heart?

Hypothyroidism increases the risk of heart disease, stroke, blood pressure, and cholesterol in many patients. While thyroid hormone replacement therapy can help relieve symptoms, it doesn’t treat them entirely. Knowing the functioning of the optimal thyroid gland is essential to understanding how hypothyroidism affects heart rate. The gland regulates body temperature by converting iodine into triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4). The thyroid gland’s two main hormones are T3 and T4, which increase with an iodine-deficient diet.

When someone has an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism), their body lacks enough T3 or T4 to maintain normal body functions such as  contractility (the ability for muscles to squeeze tightly), regulating body temperature, and controlling your heartbeat rate/rhythm. As a result, hypothyroidism negatively impacts your heart health.

Now that we have discussed the impact of hypothyroidism on cardiovascular health let’s shed some light on the relationship between hypothyroidism and Arrhythmia.

Hypothyroidism and Arrhythmias: What Is The Relationship?

While seemingly unrelated, hypothyroidism and heart arrhythmias can affect each other. Hypothyroidism can lead to arrhythmias as the thyroid hormones play a role in regulating heart rate and rhythm. Likewise, some types of heart arrhythmias can also cause hypothyroidism in patients.

Heart Arrhythmias are abnormalities in the heart’s electrical activity that cause it to beat irregularly, i.e., too rapidly or slowly. The heart’s regular beating is called sinus rhythm, while an abnormal heart rhythm is called an arrhythmia. When an arrhythmia occurs, the heart may not be able to pump enough blood to meet the body’s requirements.

What Are The Hypothyroidism Symptoms That You Should Know About?

Symptoms of hypothyroidism may vary from mild to severe depending on the patient. That being said, the most common signs of hypothyroidism are:

  • Muscle weakness or tremors
  • Facial puffiness or swelling due to fluid retention (edema)
  • Fatigue, sleepiness, and lethargy
  • Palpitations (a feeling that your heart is beating too fast)
  • Nervousness or anxiety
  • Changes in bowel habits (diarrhea or constipation) or appetite

When Should You Contact a Doctor?

If you’re experiencing symptoms of hypothyroidism, it’s essential to get in touch with your doctor. Even if the condition doesn’t require immediate treatment, it’s essential to have regular checkups to ensure your medication works and that any side effects are being addressed carefully. There is a variety of medication that is used to treat hypothyroidism.

When you’re diagnosed with hypothyroidism, one of the first things your doctor will do is prescribe medication designed to help your body produce more thyroid hormone. However, this medication isn’t always effective at treating all of the symptoms associated with hypothyroidism.

Now that you know about the relationship between Hypothyroidism and Heart Arrythmias, you should know that the best way to keep tabs on your heart condition at all times is to use a smart heart monitor.

Purchase the revolutionary Frontier X2 heart monitoring device that gives you all the information you need to stay heart healthy!

Frequently Asked Questions:


Does hypothyroidism cause irregular heartbeats? 

Hypothyroidism can aggravate irregular heartbeats causing heart arrhythmias. They can also increase the chances of heart failure.  

What kind of arrhythmia is associated with hypothyroidism? 

Some studies (ref. link) have shown that hypothyroidism can cause ventricular arrhythmias, while also increasing the risk of atrial arrhythmia.

Can hypothyroidism cause heart problems? 

Hypothyroidism has been known to affect the heart in many negative ways. It can increase the risk of heart failure and thyroid heart disease. A person suffering from hypothyroidism has an increased level of LDL, also known as bad cholesterol, that leads to various heart problems.

Does thyroid indicate a heart problem? 

Research shows that hypothyroidism has a strong effect on cardiac functioning. Hypothyroidism directly leads to a decrease in cardiac output. 

Can hypothyroidism cause heart palpitations and anxiety?

It has been proven (ref. link) that hypothyroidism can cause anxiety and increase stress in individuals if not treated on time. It has also been shown to bring about various cardiovascular dysfunctions, such as palpitations and heart arrhythmias.

Other Heart Health Topics To Explore :

Running Heart Rate Zones | Heart Attack causes | Wearable ECG Monitor | Cardio Exercise | Heart Rate While Running | Mental Stress Heart Attack Symptoms | Heart Palpitations Causes | Increased Heart Rate | Healthy Heart Tips

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Have you ever experienced discomfort in the pit of your stomach? Have you felt a rapid heartbeat without an apparent cause? If so, you may be experiencing anxiety-related symptoms. Anxiety has many physical and psychological effects on the body – in particular, the ability to cause an arrhythmia. The stress and emotional arousal associated with anxiety can cause changes to the electrical activity of the heart, leading to an irregular heartbeat. This occurs indiscriminately in patients who both have or have not had a history of arrhythmia. 

It’s important to note that while anxiety can cause an arrhythmia, it is not the only potential cause. Other potential causes of arrhythmia include underlying heart conditions, certain medication, and other health conditions. If you are experiencing symptoms of arrhythmia, such as palpitations, chest pain, or shortness of breath, it is important to speak with a healthcare provider for a proper diagnosis and treatment plan.

What Is an Arrhythmia? 

An arrhythmia is an abnormal heartbeat rhythm caused by disruptions to the electrical signals that control your heart rate. It can cause your heart to beat too fast (tachycardia), too slow (bradycardia), or erratically (irregular rhythm).  Arrhythmias can range from harmless to life-threatening in some cases. Common symptoms include chest discomfort, shortness of breath, dizziness, light-headedness, fatigue, and fainting.

How Does Anxiety Cause Arrhythmia?

Anxiety has been linked to arrhythmias due to its effects on the autonomic nervous system—the part of the nervous system responsible for controlling involuntary processes like breathing and heart rate. 

When you experience high levels of stress or anxiety, the heart perceives it as an impending threat, which sets off your fight-or-flight response. This activates your Autonomic Nervous system (ANS). Both fight and flight responses result in release of stress hormones like cortisol and adrenaline into their bloodstream (Ref. Link). These hormones increase your heart rate and blood pressure, constrict your blood vessels, and can therefore lead to an irregular heartbeat. This is why people who suffer from anxiety are more likely to experience arrhythmias than those who do not.

When your fight or flight response is engaged, the body releases stress hormones such as adrenaline which can affect the electrical activity of the heart and lead to an irregular heartbeat. This can cause palpitations, skipped beats, or other changes to the regular beating of your heart.

How Do You Diagnose Anxiety?

It’s normal to experience anxiety every now and then, especially if you can pinpoint the source of your anxiety. Events like boarding an airplane or getting ready for an interview can cause a certain level of anxiety. You should see your doctor if you frequently feel anxious, or if you suddenly find yourself feeling anxious without knowing why. It’s possible that you have an anxiety disorder that can be controlled with a combination of therapy and medication.

Diagnosis of anxiety starts with a physical examination. A mental health professional will further evaluate your symptoms to help in diagnosis.

How Do You Diagnose Arrhythmias?

If your anxiety triggers irregular heartbeats or keeps you from functioning normally, you should see a doctor. After performing a preliminary physical examination, the following tests are done.

  • Electrocardiogram (ECG)
  • Holter monitoring-prolonged monitoring for 24-48 hours
  • Self-monitoring heart monitors such as the Frontier X2.

What Are the Treatment and Management Options for Arrhythmia Caused by Anxiety?

Treatment and management options for arrhythmia caused by anxiety may include:

  • Lifestyle changes: Exercising regularly, eating a healthy diet, and getting enough sleep can all help reduce anxiety and the risk of arrhythmia.
  • Stress management techniques: Relaxation techniques (e.g., deep breathing, meditation, progressive muscle relaxation), therapy (e.g., cognitive-behavioral therapy), and exercise can help manage stress and reduce anxiety. Cognitive behavioral therapy identifies and treats dysfunctional thought patterns. 
  • Medication: In some cases, medications may be prescribed to help manage arrhythmias caused by anxiety. These may include beta blockers, which can help slow the heart rate and reduce the risk of arrhythmia, or anti-anxiety medications, which can help reduce feelings of anxiety.
  • Cardiac procedures: In some cases, cardiac procedures such as a cardioversion or ablation may be necessary to treat arrhythmia caused by anxiety. These procedures involve the use of medications or electrical shocks to reset the heart’s normal rhythm.

How can you manage anxiety related Arrhythmias?

Here  are some steps you can take to unwind and calm your fluttering heart. Several tried-and-tested  methods of relaxation are:

  • Yoga: Yoga aids in lowering stress and anxiety. Your mood and general sense of wellbeing may be improved by yoga.
  • Meditation: Regular practice  of meditation significantly reduces anxiety over time.(Ref. Link)
  • Walking: Walking and regular exercise increases blood flow, thereby reducing stress and anxiety.
  • Sound sleep : A good 7 to 8 hours sleep is essential to combat daily stress.
  • Deep breathing exercises : Taking small , calm breaths help in  stress relief and 
  • emotional equilibrium.
  • Talk to someone: Reaching out to a supportive friend or family member enables you to relieve stress by expressing your feelings.

Anxiety is an extremely common affliction, and is one that is best handled by being cognizant of it. In the same way, keeping tabs on your heart is the best way to ensure its health. Purchase the revolutionary Frontier X2 to always stay on top of your heart health!

Frequently Asked Questions:


What is anxiety?

Feelings of tension, anxious thoughts, and physical changes like elevated blood pressure are all characteristics of anxiety.

Is there a link between anxiety and arrhythmia?

Anxiety or stress release stress hormones which causes arrhythmias or irregular heart rhythm

What are the symptoms of arrhythmia?

Some of the symptoms of arrhythmia include a fluttering in the chest, a rapid (tachycardia) or slow heart rate (bradycardia), chest pain, and shortness of breath.

Other Heart Health Topics To Explore:

Heart Health Monitor DevicesCardiac Arrhythmia | Heart Palpitations | Running Heart Rate Zones | Low Heart Rate | Heart Rate Monitor | Mental Stress | Heart Attack Symptoms | Heart Palpitations Causes | Increased Heart rate

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Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) is a type of irregular heartbeat that occurs suddenly and typically lasts for a short period of time. It is a form of atrial fibrillation – a common type of arrhythmia that affects the heart’s upper chambers (the atria). In atrial fibrillation, the normal electrical signals that coordinate the contraction of the atria are disrupted, causing the atria to contract rapidly and irregularly. This can lead to an irregular and often rapid heartbeat, as well as other symptoms such as palpitations, shortness of breath, and chest pain.

Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation is characterised by episodes of AF that come and go on their own, usually lasting between a few minutes to a few days. These episodes can occur without warning, and may be triggered by factors such as stress, alcohol consumption, or other health conditions.

Treatment for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation may include medication to control the heart rate and rhythm, lifestyle changes to reduce the risk of triggers, and procedures such as cardioversion or ablation to restore normal heart rhythm. In some cases, long-term treatment with blood thinners may be necessary to prevent blood clots and reduce the risk of stroke.

What are the Causes of Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation

There are several potential causes of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, including:

  1. Heart disease: Certain heart conditions – such as coronary artery disease, heart valve problems, and high blood pressure – can increase the risk of developing atrial fibrillation.
  2. Thyroid disorders: An overactive or underactive thyroid gland can cause abnormal heart rhythms, including atrial fibrillation.
  3. Alcohol consumption: Excessive alcohol consumption can contribute to the development of atrial fibrillation, especially in people who have a history of heavy drinking.
  4. Stress and anxiety: Emotional stress and anxiety can trigger episodes of atrial fibrillation.
  5. Other medical conditions: Certain medical conditions like sleep apnea, anemia, and pulmonary embolism can increase the risk of developing atrial fibrillation.
  6. Certain medication: Some medications, such as stimulants and over-the-counter cold and allergy medications, can cause atrial fibrillation as a side effect.

It’s important to note that in many cases, the exact cause of atrial fibrillation might remain unknown.

Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation: What are the Symptoms of This Condition?

The most common symptoms of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation are:

  1. Irregular heartbeat: This can feel like your heart is fluttering or racing, and even possibly as though it has skipped a beat.
  2. Palpitations: People with atrial fibrillation may feel their heart racing or pounding in their chest.
  3. Shortness of breath: Atrial fibrillation can cause an irregular heartbeat and reduced blood flow to the body, which leads to shortness of breath.
  4. Chest pain: Some people with atrial fibrillation may experience chest pain or discomfort.
  5. Dizziness or lightheadedness: Atrial fibrillation can cause a reduced supply of oxygen-rich blood to the brain, leading to dizziness or lightheadedness.
  6. Fatigue: Atrial fibrillation can cause a reduced supply of oxygen-rich blood to the body, leading to feelings of fatigue.

It’s important to note that not everyone with atrial fibrillation will experience all of these symptoms, and the severity of symptoms can vary widely from person to person. If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, it’s important to speak with a healthcare provider to determine the cause so you can receive appropriate treatment.

Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation: What are the Complications Associated with This Condition?

Major and frequent consequences of AFib include stroke and systemic embolism. Stroke risk is increased 4- to 5-fold in those with AFib compared to those without the condition. Even when a person with AFib is not experiencing an episode of AFib, they may still be at an increased risk of stroke due to other, as-yet-unknown risk factors linked with AFib. While having more AFib does increase your risk of stroke and systemic embolism, this risk appears to be largely unrelated to the severity of your condition.

A stroke can occur when clots in the bloodstream reach the brain. They can also cause systemic embolism by getting stuck in your digestive tract, limbs, or kidneys, preventing blood from reaching those areas. Long-term untreated AFib can weaken the heart to the point where it can no longer efficiently pump blood and oxygen throughout the body, resulting in congestive heart failure.

Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation: What Are the Treatment Options?

Fortunately, several treatments are available to slow down or even stop the progression of AFib.

Medication

Your doctor may prescribe medication to treat your condition if it has a known medical cause, such as an overactive thyroid or high blood pressure. If possible, your doctor will take measures to maintain a regular heart rate and avoid complications like blood clots. Drugs that slow the heart rate are standard treatment for Atrial Fibrillation. Long-term treatment with blood thinners may be necessary to prevent blood clots and reduce the risk of stroke in people with atrial fibrillation. After the doctor has stabilised your heart rate, they may prescribe medicine to restore a normal rhythm.

Surgery 

If your AFib is not under control with medication, your doctor may suggest electrical cardioversion. The doctor delivers a shock to the heart to restore a normal rhythm. They might use paddles or adhesive patches called electrodes on your chest to induce a response. You’ll start by taking something to help you sleep. The next step is for your doctor to place the paddles on your chest and, occasionally, your back. To restore normal heart rhythm, they will deliver electrical shocks.

Even those who need medication for Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation generally lead normal, healthy lives. Living effectively with paroxysmal AFib requires managing risk factors, being aware of potential triggers, and developing a long-term management strategy with a physician.

Final Thoughts

The best way to manage any heart condition is to be aware of your heart’s functioning. The best way to do that is to use the revolutionary Frontier X2 smart heart monitoring device that gives you all the information you need to always stay heart healthy!

Frequently Asked Questions


Can anxiety lead to Atrial Fibrillation?

The links between Atrial Fibrillation and anxiety are not fully understood. However, studies have linked AFib to anxiety (if you have AFib, you might worry about your symptoms or quality of life).

What is the frequency of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation?

AFib has been dubbed the “new cardiovascular disease epidemic of the 21st century” by some researchers. AFib is particularly prevalent in older people. Globally, around 33 million people over 55 have been diagnosed.

How does my body respond to Atrial Fibrillation?

Your heart’s electrical system isn’t functioning properly if you have AFib. Your heartbeat is erratic and quick due to the wild electrical impulses in your body.

What issues should I bring up with my doctor?

Make sure to mention any new symptoms or issues, such as side effects from medication, at each visit. Although your healthcare practitioner will question you, it’s crucial to ask questions.

What changes occur with paroxysmal A-fib over time?

AFib becomes chronic if symptoms last for more than a week. Persistent AFib may progress to permanent AFib if it happens more frequently. When in doubt, patients should always consult their doctor.

 

Other Heart Health Topics To Explore:

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Frontier X2:

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Aquatic exercise continues to grow in popularity due to the soothing properties of water. Simply put, aquatic therapy (or water exercise) takes place in a swimming pool under the supervision of a healthcare professional. Some of the goals of aquatic therapy include improved flexibility, improved balance, and reduced stress. This therapy has a number of benefits for heart health, including:

  1. Low impact: Aquatic exercise is low impact, meaning it puts less stress on the joints than activities like running or jumping. This makes it an ideal form of exercise for people with joint issues, or those who are looking to reduce their risk of injury.
  2. Heart health benefits: Aquatic exercise can improve cardiovascular fitness, helping to strengthen the heart, and increase blood flow. It can also help to lower blood pressure and reduce the risk of heart disease.
  3. Resistance training: The water provides natural resistance, which can help to strengthen the muscles and improve overall muscle tone. This can also help improve balance and stability.
  4. Relaxation and stress reduction: Aquatic exercise can also be a great way to relax and reduce stress. The buoyancy of the water helps reduce muscle tension and the soothing sound of the water helps create a calming atmosphere.
  5. Flexibility: Aquatic exercise improves flexibility as the water provides a natural resistance that can help to stretch and lengthen the muscles.

It’s important to note that aquatic exercise should be done as part of a well-rounded exercise program that includes a variety of activities. It’s always a good idea to consult with a healthcare professional before starting any new exercise program. Research (Ref. Link) shows that exercises that improve strength and mobility can be done in water. 

How Can You Lower Blood Pressure with Water Exercise?

Aquatic exercise can help to lower blood pressure by:

  1. Improving cardiovascular fitness: Aquatic exercise can increase blood flow and strengthen your heart, which can help to lower blood pressure.
  2. Reducing stress: Aquatic exercise can also be a great way to relax and reduce stress, which can help to lower blood pressure.
  3. Burning calories: Aquatic exercise can also help to burn calories, which can help to lower blood pressure by reducing body weight and fat mass.

How Can You Reduce Stress And Loneliness With Aquatic Exercise?

Aquatic exercise can help to reduce stress by:

  • Providing a calming atmosphere: The soothing sound of the water and the peaceful surroundings of a pool or other body of water can help to create a calming atmosphere that promotes relaxation.
  • Reducing muscle tension: The buoyancy of the water can help to reduce muscle tension and promote relaxation.
  • Promoting mindfulness: Aquatic exercise can also help to promote mindfulness and focus, which can help to reduce stress and improve overall well-being.

In terms of loneliness, aquatic exercise can provide a social outlet and a sense of community, which can help to reduce feelings of loneliness. Many people participate in aquatic exercise classes or join a swim team, which can provide opportunities for social interaction and connection with others.

Which Water Aerobics Exercises Are Best for Heart Health?

Water aerobics exercises can be a great way to improve your heart health and overall fitness. Some examples of water aerobics exercises that are particularly good for the heart include:

  1. Aqua jogging: This exercise involves running or jogging in place in the water, using a flotation device to support your body. It’s a low-impact exercise that’s easy on your joints, but still provides a good cardiovascular workout.
  2. Aquatic cycling: This exercise involves using a stationary bike in the water, which provides resistance as you pedal. It’s a good way to get your heart rate up and improve your cardiovascular endurance.
  3. Aquatic kickboxing: This exercise combines cardio and strength training, as you throw punches and kicks in the water. It’s a high-energy workout that can get your heart rate up and improve your cardiovascular fitness.
  4. Aquatic lunges: This exercise involves stepping forward and lunging in the water, using the resistance of the water to challenge your muscles. It’s a good way to improve your cardiovascular fitness and strengthen your lower body.
  5. Aquatic step aerobics: This exercise involves stepping up and down on a platform in the water, using the resistance of the water to challenge your muscles. It’s a good way to improve your cardiovascular fitness and strengthen your lower body.

Aquatic exercise is a safe and efficient training method for patients following a recent blow to the heart. Patients with cardiac illnesses who engage in endurance plus calisthenics exercise training in the water see changes in their exercise capacity and vascular function that are equivalent to those seen with other exercises. 

Finally, pair your new workout routine with the use of a smart heart monitor to ensure what you’re doing is making you healthier. Purchase the revolutionary Frontier X2 and get all the information required to stay on top of your heart health.

Frequently Asked Questions on Aquatic Exercise :


What should I wear for an aquatic exercise class?

It’s important to wear a swimsuit that fits properly and allows you to move freely in the water. If you’re participating in an aquatic exercise class, you may also want to wear a swim cap to keep your hair out of your face, and goggles to protect your eyes from the chlorine in the pool.

Do I need to be able to swim to participate in an aquatic exercise class?

Not necessarily. Many aquatic exercise classes are designed for people who are not strong swimmers, and they may be held in shallow water where you can stand. However, it’s always a good idea to be comfortable in the water and to know how to swim at least a little bit, in case of an emergency.

Can I get the same benefits from aquatic exercise as I would from land-based exercise?

Aquatic exercise can provide many of the same benefits as land-based exercise, such as improving cardiovascular fitness, strengthening muscles, and increasing flexibility. However, the water’s buoyancy can make it easier on your joints, making it a good option for people who have joint problems or are recovering from an injury.

Is aquatic exercise safe for pregnant women?

Aquatic exercise can be a safe and effective way for pregnant women to stay active. The water’s buoyancy can help support the weight of the baby and reduce stress on the joints. However, it’s important to consult with a healthcare provider before starting any new exercise program, particularly if you’re pregnant.

Is aquatic exercise safe for people with medical conditions?

Aquatic exercise can be a safe and effective way for people with certain medical conditions to stay active. However, it’s important to consult with a healthcare provider before starting any new exercise program, particularly if you have a medical condition.

 

Other Heart Health Topics To Explore:

Exercise and Atrial Fibrillation | Low Carb Diet | Types of Atrial Fibrillation | Heart Palpitation After Eating | Stretching Exercise for Heart Health | Silent Heart Atatck | Stress Test for Heart | Menopause and Heart Palpitation | Running Heart Rate | Heart Rate Monitor

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